Racing live: Saturday’s runners, tips-off, news, rumor and results as Trackman reports live from Sandown on S – The Sun

Racing live: Saturdayas athletes, tips-off, news, rumor and outcomes as Trackman reports live from Sandown on S The Sun

Your one-stop shop for all of Saturday’s racing action.

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21 intimate portraits of rare, endangered, and disappearing animals.

Nature feels different when you can actually look it in the eyes.

For more than two years, photographer Tim Flach has been capturing images of rare, threatened, and endangered animals.

Many of Flach’s photos were purposefully framed to resemble portraits of humans, focusing in on the animals’ faces. The consequence is striking — there’s a lot of great nature photography out there, but ensure an eagle from a distance and getting to stimulate eye contact are two very different experiences.

Giant pandas live in bamboo woodlands in China. It’s estimated there are just over 1,800 left in the wild. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

After all, there’s some frisson about looking into someone’s eyes — a small thrill, or anxiety, or excitement that comes from the sudden intimacy.

Capturing that frisson wasn’t always easy, though. Some shoots were taken in nature preserves or zoos, but Flach also travelled the world to find his subjects — including the wobbly-nosed saiga below.

The saiga’s ridiculous nose might help filter and warm the cold air it breathes. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

Saiga are wild antelope that live near the Caspian Sea, where locals hunt them down on mopeds. In order to get their portrait, Flach originally had travelled to the region in the summer, but the climate objective up being so hot, it actually distorted his pictures of the rare antelope. He had to go back during the( equally harsh) wintertime to get the shot.

Flach has now turned his project into a volume, “Endangered, ” which was published by Abrams and is available online. If you want to see more of Flach’s portraits, check out 21 more of them below 😛 TAGEND

1. Axolotl

Axolotl hail from Mexico and, unlike most salamanders, keep their gills their entire lives. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

2. Beluga sturgeon

Demand for beluga caviar has led to heavy fishing of this massive fish. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

3. Bengal tiger

Bengal tigers are some of the biggest wild cats in the world. Fewer than 2,500 may still live in the wild. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

4. Blue-throated macaw

Blue-throated macaws live in Bolivia and are threatened by the illegal pet trade. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

5. Chimpanzee

Chimpanzees are some of humanity’s closest living animal relatives. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

6. Crowned sifaka lemur

Sifakas, like all lemurs, are endemic to Madagascar. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

7. Golden snub-nosed monkey

These monkeys live in central and southwest China. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

8. Iberian lynx

There used to be less than 100 of these rare wild cats, but thanks to conservation endeavours, their numbers are rebounding. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

9. Gharial

Gharials are related to crocodiles and live around India and Pakistan. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

10. Lemur leaf frog

Lemur leaf frogs are natives to Central and South America and threatened by habitat loss and fungus. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

11. Mandrill

Mandrills are the world’s largest monkey and live in Central Africa. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

12. Northern white rhino

Northern white rhinos are some of the rarest animals on Earth. As of this writing, only three may remain. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

13. Philippines eagle

One of the largest eagles in the world, the Phillipine eagle is known for eating monkeys. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

14. Pied tamarin

These monkeys come from a single, tiny region in Brazil. The term “pied” refers to their multicolored heads and bodies. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

15. Proboscis monkey

Hahaha, look at that schnoz. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

16. Ring-tailed lemur

Ring-tailed lemurs are some of Madagascar’s most recognizable denizens. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

17. Sea angels

Though these sea angels might look like little airplanes, they are, in fact, a kind of free-swimming slug. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

18. Shoebill

Shoebills live in eastern Africa and are kind of intimidating, if I’m being honest. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

19. Snow leopard

Snow leopards live high in the Himalayas and are famous for their stealth and jumping ability. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

20. Western lowland gorilla

The Western Lowland Gorilla’s scientific name is Gorilla gorilla gorilla . That’s awesome. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

21. White-bellied pangolin

Pangolins are some of the most trafficked animals in the world. Photo from Tim Flach/ Tim Flach Photography Ltd ./ Abrams, used with permission.

Flach hopes that by framing these rare and endangered animals in this way, it can help people reconnect with nature.

We come from the natural world and depend on it. As our lives become more digital and removed, we need a way to reconnect to the other animals that share the planet with us.

“The most important message is that it’s not simply images of animals but that every aspect of our being is influenced by the natural world around us, ” Flach told The Guardian.

If you want to see more of Flach’s work, follow his Instagram , Facebook , or Twitter , or visit his website . His book, “Endangered, ” is available from the publisher’s website .

Read more: www.upworthy.com

Ed Sheeran’s engagement photo on Instagram is simply adorable

BTW

Ed Sheeran is officially off the dating marketplace. And he’s published the reason why to his Instagram account.

Yes, the famed singer said on Saturday he’s engaged to his longtime girlfriend Cherry Seaborn, and apparently, even his cats are ecstatic about the upcoming nuptials.

According to the BBC, the two began dating in high school and that she’s a hockey superstar who helped the junior English team win a bronze medal at the European Championships in 2012.

Sheeran previously said that a transgres from music in 2016 helped his romantic relationship.

“This has been the first time I’ve ever actually had the time to fall in love properly, ” he said, via BBC. “I’ve always got into relationships very passionately–I’m a redhead and also Irish … I’m ready, let’s go–tour bus babies, little fat, chubby babies that merely walk around.”

As Buzzfeed points out, Sheeran said he wrote his hit song “Perfect” about Seaborn.

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Crown wants dogs that mauled a cat to demise in St. John’s surrendered to SPCA – The Telegram

Crown wants dogs that mauled a cat to death in St. John’s surrendered to SPCA The Telegram

A St. John’s woman whose dogs mauled a cat to death last summertime is asking the court not to take her animals away from her, but to give her a $500 penalty instead.

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From the Cookie Monster cat to ballistic missile: when text and email alerts go wrong

The US embassy in Australia spammed recipients with a picture of a cat this week but thats nothing compared with other recent message fails

The US embassy in Canberra, Australia, sent out an email invitation this week to untold numbers of recipients, in Latin, with a picture of a cat keep biscuits in a turquoise Cookie Monster onesie. It was, of course, an error, though not one I can see any reasonable person being truly irked by. It also wasn’t the first of its kind. In 2014, the retailer Fab followed up its own subscriber-destined email of nothing but a cat with another, featuring two cats, explaining that it had been” purrrly a mistake”, and attaching an apologetic 10% discount code.

Messaging systems the world over seem to be having a bad year of it, spanning the full spectrum of societal anxiety, from -Alevel outcomes to intercontinental ballistic missiles.

In August, Ucas emailed 4,100 prospective students to congratulate them on getting into university- merely to quickly return with an:” Earlier today, we sent you this email by mistake .” And then they did it again!” Imagine being told you’ve gotten into Newcastle Uni by UCAS ,” tweeted @aliyafoxx,” only to get another email saying it was sent by mistake. TWICE .”

Also in August, AlertDC, an opt-in text-message notification service in Washington DC, sent all its subscribers a longwinded message about a presidential proclamation on the deaths among John McCain, signed by Donald Trump himself.” Why is trump send me texts now ?”, tweeted @jessicakathryn. In fact, he wasn’t: a message intended for a federal employee mailing list got sent to the general public instead. Her question did betray the nation’s jitters, though, at their president’s ability to use the text emergency alert system.

In May, residents in Salem, Oregon, were sent a text message that all the more unsettling for its mystifying accuracy. Warning them of a civil emergency in the area until 11.28 pm PDT, it exhorted they: “Prepare for ACTION OEM,1,OR.” The Marion County sheriff’s office later tweeted that the message was a drinking water advisory gone wrong.

In January, Hawaiian authorities sent a” this is not a drill” emergency text-message alert to all residents,telling them to immediately seek shelter- ballistic missiles incoming. Thirty-eight minutes later, another SMS came through saying it was a false alarm. The same month, the Japan Meteorological Agency issued a 6.4 -magnitude earthquake warn for the Ibaraki coastal area to millions of mobile phones. Officials later worked out that the early warning system had mistakenly conflated two smaller quakes into one big one.

There is something reassuring about the very human messiness at the heart of the IT supersystem. No department, however high-ranking, it would seem, is immune to unintentionally reaching” reply all “.

Read more: www.theguardian.com